3 Quick Tips on Writing a Readable Tweet

by: Kenneth Cossin

I know there are so many ways to write a tweet, but are you writing yours to make it easily readable by your followers?  I can guarantee that your readers are not likely to read what you are tweeting if they cannot read it quickly.  Here are my tips on writing a good tweet.

Verify the Link You are Sending

Make sure that the link to the article, story, video, photo, etc. you are sending is well-written  and easy to read with no misspellings, the video plays and is short and sweet, and the photos are attention-grabbing.

Use Hashtags in the Correct Locations

Use hastags in sentences to a minimum.  Place them at the end so as to not interrupt the flow of reading.  Overuse of hashtags makes your tweets look like gibberish.

Place Usernames after Your Links

Typically we will put a Twtter username when we are mentioning someone because of an article they wrote.  Be sure not to place the usernames strewn about throughout the tweet.

Example of a Bad Tweet

#Apple @MacRumors releases the new #iPad #Mini http://boguslink.notreal

Example of a Good Tweet

Apple releases the new iPad Mini http://boguslink.notreal via @MacRumors #Apple #iPad

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Who Cares about Near Field Communication?

by: Kenneth Cossin

In 2006, Nokia released the first mobile phone to have Near Field Communication (NFC) technology.  The thought behind initially including this technology was for ease of sharing information and content with other devices.

Near Field Communication

Photo: iPhone 5 Forum

As smartphones became popular in the market in 2008, developers of these devices started to think of new ways to use NFC.  The idea of using our smartphones as a way to store our credit card and banking information became the new concept.  Consumers could pay with their smartphones at any NFC terminal.

Although, Near Field Communication has seen a rough road for several reasons.  One is that merchants are wanting consumers to have the capability to use NFC for payment before investing in the technology for their businesses.  Consumers want merchants to offer payment methods like NFC at their locations.  Hardware developers are concerned about security, and major players such as Apple have shied away from adding this technology.  Therefore, traction for this technology is lagging… for now.

Apple is in the process of working out a plan for its own version of NFC.  While some may see this choice as a delay tactic or a way to control what is going on with NFC, I believe that Apple is being cautious.  Whether or not this path is the right one, I believe that mobile developers need to solidify mobile couponing and creating worth-while in-app deals and incentives before moving on to the next big thing.